BSL Video editing

and BSL recording

Involve Interpreter can support you to add BSL to your digital content to ensure your organisation is fully accessible to deaf people

BSL Video Editing & Recording


Our BSL Video Editing & Recording service offers a flexible approach for 
organisations to ensure that written, audio or digital content is made accessible for deaf people, whatever their communication preference.

Involve Interpreter have a diverse team of BSL translators who are highly experienced in delivering BSL translations for a wide range of content such as promotional videos, national TV programmes, training videos and more.

The BSL Video Editing service includes:

b3lineicon|b3icon-user-talk||User Talk

Subtitles
& voiceovers

b3lineicon|b3icon-pencil||Pencil

Text
modification

b3lineicon|b3icon-book-open||Book Open

Transcripts – audio or video recordings without subtitles made accessible in Verbatim or Plain English 

b3lineicon|b3icon-play-button||Play Button
Editing – Green screen, simple graphics, and video‐in‐video services 
b3lineicon|b3icon-file-text||File Text
Translations – BSL/English translations into either language 

Why add BSL to your videos?

These services enable organisations to meet statutory requirements for providing access to information for deaf users. Our translations are suitable for internal and external web access and can be branded to match the organisation. 
 
It’s important to make your content accessible to everyone, as your staff, customers and clients may be deaf. Providing BSL interpretation not only promotes awareness of BSL users, but guarantees a wider range of viewers, which will boost business opportunities for your organisation.

See how the Involve Interpreter BSL
Video Editing service has created Deaf
accessible content for organisations

Request a quote for your BSL video editing and recording project now!

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If you are Deaf and would like information
about our Access to Work services, CLICK HERE.

Meet our BSL Interpreter Manager, Dionne Thomas

When asked how long she had been an interpreter, Dionne replied “I have been qualified since 2011 but started as a trainee 10 years ago. I started as a volunteer for Merseyside Society for Deaf people, supporting older people and training them how to use a minicom – old deaf tech that was used instead of phone calls back in the day. However, it’s now obsolete and everyone has smartphones, video calls, and social media for communication.”

You can read more about Dionne on her meet the team post.